The effects of emotion and need for cognition on consumer choice involving risk

Chien Huang Lin, Hsiu Ju Rebecca Yen, Shin Chieh Chuang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Building upon previous research, this article proposes that the effect of mood on risk-taking is moderated by the individual's need for cognition. The hypothesized effect of mood and the need for cognition are tested with different types of consumer choices in three studies. Consistent with the hypotheses, the results indicate that the subjects in happy mood tend to be risk-aversive while the subjects in sad mood incline to take risks. Furthermore, the mood affects risk-taking behavior more for the low-NFC subjects than for the high-NFC ones. Finally, implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-60
Number of pages14
JournalMarketing Letters
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

Keywords

  • Compromise effect
  • Consumer choice
  • Moods
  • Need for cognition
  • Risk-taking

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