The association between working memory precision and the nonlinear dynamics of frontal and parieto-occipital EEG activity

Wen Sheng Chang, Wei Kuang Liang, Dong Han Li, Neil G. Muggleton, Prasad Balachandran, Norden E. Huang, Chi Hung Juan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Electrophysiological working memory (WM) research shows brain areas communicate via macroscopic oscillations across frequency bands, generating nonlinear amplitude modulation (AM) in the signal. Traditionally, AM is expressed as the coupling strength between the signal and a prespecified modulator at a lower frequency. Therefore, the idea of AM and coupling cannot be studied separately. In this study, 33 participants completed a color recall task while their brain activity was recorded through EEG. The AM of the EEG data was extracted using the Holo-Hilbert spectral analysis (HHSA), an adaptive method based on the Hilbert-Huang transforms. The results showed that WM load modulated parieto-occipital alpha/beta power suppression. Furthermore, individuals with higher frontal theta power and lower parieto-occipital alpha/beta power exhibited superior WM precision. In addition, the AM of parieto-occipital alpha/beta power predicted WM precision after presenting a target-defining probe array. The phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between the frontal theta phase and parieto-occipital alpha/beta AM increased with WM load while processing incoming stimuli, but the PAC itself did not predict the subsequent recall performance. These results suggest frontal and parieto-occipital regions communicate through theta-alpha/beta PAC. However, the overall recall precision depends on the alpha/beta AM following the onset of the retro cue.

Original languageEnglish
Article number14252
JournalScientific Reports
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The association between working memory precision and the nonlinear dynamics of frontal and parieto-occipital EEG activity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this