Synchronous vascular endothelial growth factor protein profiles in both tissue and serum identify metastasis and poor survival in colorectal cancer

Chien Chih Yeh, Li Jane Shih, Junn Liang Chang, Yi Wei Tsuei, Chang Chieh Wu, Cheng Wen Hsiao, Chih Pin Chuu, Yung Hsi Kao

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. We examined if tumor tissue and circulating protein levels of all vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) were synchronous and different in Taiwan patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) vs. non-mCRC. We analyzed samples from 109 patients enrolled from 2005–2017, 50 with stages I/II and 59 with stages III/IV CRC. We found that VEGF-A, -B, -C, -D, placental growth factor (PlGF), VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, and VEGFR-3 were higher in tumor tissues than non-tumor tissues. Metastatic patients had higher levels of circulating VEGFs and soluble VEGFRs (sVEGFRs) than healthy subjects, as well as higher VEGF-A, -B, -C, -D, and PlGF proteins in both tumor tissue and serum than non-metastatic patients. Protein levels of VEGF and VEGFR were mainly associated with the patient’s age, tumor site, tumor size, tumor stage, and lymph node metastasis. Patients exhibiting high levels of VEGF, VEGFR, and sVEGFR had a shorter overall survival and disease-free survival than those with low levels. We conclude that synchronous changes in VEGF and VEGFR levels in CRC tissue and serum VEGF can discriminate between metastatic and non-metastatic subjects and high levels are associated with poor survival in CRC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4228
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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