Surface Current Variations and Hydrological Characteristics of the Penghu Channel in the Southeastern Taiwan Strait

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Coastal ocean dynamics application radar (CODAR) SeaSonde high-frequency (HF) radars deployed along the coast of Taiwan were used to reveal ocean surface current variations both hourly and through climatological seasons in the Penghu Channel (PHC), southeastern Taiwan Strait (TS), from December 2014 to December 2020. The ocean current in the PHC has a semidiurnal tidal cycle, and the seasonal main flow, wind direction, and wind strength significantly affect the direction and speed of the flow passing through the PHC. The speed of the tidal current in the PHC area can reach more than 1 m/s, and the monthly average flow speed in the PHC is between 0.12 (winter) and 0.24 m/s (summer). Several buoys indicated that the southward flow along the western coast of Taiwan drifted through the PHC in fall and winter. The HF radar observations confirmed the same, implying that this occurred during the strong northeastern monsoon. For a weak northerly wind or even southerly wind, the flow in the PHC can be northward. Different wind directions can affect the speed of the flow passing through the PHC and the branch flow in the northern PHC. The HF radar results are highly consistent with the spatial characteristics of satellite data regarding the sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, and chlorophyll concentrations; however, there are significant differences from the satellite-derived ocean current.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1816
JournalRemote Sensing
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2022

Keywords

  • Kuroshio
  • Taiwan Strait
  • coastal radar
  • drifter
  • ocean chlorophyll
  • ocean currents
  • sea surface salinity
  • sea surface temperature

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Surface Current Variations and Hydrological Characteristics of the Penghu Channel in the Southeastern Taiwan Strait'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this