Superposition of Gobi Dust and Southeast Asian Biomass Burning: The Effect of Multisource Long-Range Transport on Aerosol Optical Properties and Regional Meteorology Modification

Kan Huang, Joshua S. Fu, Neng Hui Lin, Sheng Hsiang Wang, Xinyi Dong, Guochen Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

One unique long-range transport event with multiple layers of aerosol plumes was observed over Taiwan during 29–31 March 2006. A synergy of ground-based observation, remote sensing, and backward trajectory simulation collectively indicated the high-altitude (above 3 km) plume originated from biomass burning in Southeast Asia while the midaltitude (around 0.8–2 km) plume was attributed to dust from the Gobi Desert. Aerosol optical properties measured at a low-altitude site were characterized of abundant coarse mode particles and increased single scattering albedo as a function of increased wavelength, indicating the influence from dust particles. While at a high mountain site (elevation of ~3 km), aerosol optical depth was elevated by a factor of 3–4 compared to its background value and mainly comprised of fine particles. It was diagnosed that the high-altitude aerosols were influenced by the transported smoke plumes but exempted from dust. Simulation of the meteorological conditions against a Taiwan-wide meteorology network showed strong near surface temperature rise of more than 2° during this long-range transport event as well as for the vertical temperature profiles. Both dust and biomass burning aerosol plumes via long-range transport contributed significantly to the atmospheric warming, resulting in strong instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing of 46.0 W/m2 in the atmosphere. A “double dome” warming effect mechanism was proposed that both biomass burning and dust plumes above the boundary layer could efficiently reserve the solar energy and heat the lower troposphere.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9464-9483
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume124
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 27 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Superposition of Gobi Dust and Southeast Asian Biomass Burning: The Effect of Multisource Long-Range Transport on Aerosol Optical Properties and Regional Meteorology Modification'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this