Seismic responses of short grouped-piles embedded in liquefiable sandy soils during earthquakes

Chung Jung Lee, Wen Yi Hung, Chen Hui Tsai, Yi Chun Tu, Chin Chen Huang, Yuan Chieh Wu, Meng Hsiu Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A series of centrifuge shaking table tests was conducted to simulate the seismic responses of grouped-piles that was embedded in liquefiable sandy soils and subjected to earthquake loading. The grouped-piles connected with a pile cap were used to support 4 sets of model dry storage spent fuel casks. Different test conditions including the elevations of pile cap, and the grouped-piles embedded in the dry and saturated sand beds with the different levels of groundwater table are reported. Using pre-shaking the profile of shear wave velocity in the tested sand bed and the natural frequencies of both the sand bed and the grouped-piles were determined. The lower shear wave velocities and the lower natural frequencies were measured for the saturated sand bed, but no obvious difference in the natural frequency of the grouped-piles system with the pile cap embedded in the sand deposit were observed. The grouped-piles with the pile cap exposed to the ground surface and embedded in the saturated sand bed have the lowest natural frequency. The magnitudes of bending moment along pile depths would increase with the increases of base shaking. The lowest bending moment were measured for the grouped-piles with the pile cap embedded in the dry sand bed while the largest bending moments were observed for the grouped-piles with the pile cap embedded in the saturated sand bed and the groundwater table at the surface.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1218-1225
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of GEOMATE
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Centrifuge modeling
  • Grouped-piles
  • Liquefaction
  • Seismic response
  • Shaking table test

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Seismic responses of short grouped-piles embedded in liquefiable sandy soils during earthquakes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this