Quality of Life after Surgery or Surveillance for Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Shih Ping Cheng, Jie Jen Lee, Tsang Pai Liu, Po Sheng Yang, Sung Chen Liu, Yi Chiung Hsu, Chien Liang Liu

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19 Scopus citations

Abstract

A number of studies have investigated the effects of surgery on symptoms and quality of life in patients with hyperparathyroidism. However, the results are inconsistent. We conducted this meta-analysis to quantitatively assess changes in quality of life among patients with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism. Different databases were searched for randomized controlled trials comparing surgery with surveillance. Quality of life was measured by the Short Form-36 general health survey. The pooled random-effects estimates of standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Three trials involving 294 participants were included. At 1 year, patients undergoing parathyroidectomy had significantly better physical role functioning (SMD, 0.31; 95% CI 0.04-0.57; P=0.02) and emotional role functioning (SMD, 0.29; 95% CI 0.02-0.55; P=0.03). At 2 years, the surgery group had significantly better emotional role functioning (SMD, 0.35; 95% CI 0.02-0.67; P=0.04) than the surveillance group. Furthermore, compared with baseline, emotional role functioning improved after surgery (SMD, 0.31; 95% CI 0.02-0.60; P=0.04), whereas emotional role functioning tended to get worse in patients assigned to medical surveillance (SMD, -0.27; 95% CI -0.55 to 0.02; P=0.07). Although Short Form-36 is a generic instrument, our results suggest that parathyroidectomy may be associated with better quality of life, especially in the emotional aspects of well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e931
JournalMedicine (United States)
Volume94
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Jun 2015

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