Microstructure evolution of tin under electromigration studied by synchrotron x-ray micro-diffraction

Albert T. Wu, J. R. Lloyd, N. Tamura, K. N. Tu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Under constant current electromigration, white tin (β-Sn) exhibited a resistance drop of up to 10%. It has a body-center tetragonal (BCT) structure, and the resistivity along the a and b axes is 35% smaller than that along the c axis. Microstructure evolution under electromigration could be responsible for the resistance drop. Synchrotron radiation white beam x-ray microdiffraction was used to study this evolution. Both stress and grain orientation was studied. Grain-by-grain analysis was obtained from the diffracted Laue patterns about the changes of grain orientation during electromigration testing in ex-situ and in-situ samples. We observed that high resistance grains re-orient with respect to the neighboring low resistance grains, most likely by grain rotation of the latter. A different mechanism of microstructure evolution under electromigration from the normal grain growth is proposed and discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2005 10th International Symposium on Advanced Packaging Materials
Subtitle of host publicationProcesses, Properties and Interfaces
Pages178-180
Number of pages3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 10th International Symposium on Advanced Packaging Materials: Processes, Properties and Interfaces - Irvine, CA, United States
Duration: 16 Mar 200518 Mar 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Symposium and Exhibition on Advanced Packaging Materials Processes, Properties and Interfaces
Volume2005

Conference

Conference2005 10th International Symposium on Advanced Packaging Materials: Processes, Properties and Interfaces
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityIrvine, CA
Period16/03/0518/03/05

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