Interactive 3-dimensional virtual reality rehabilitation for patients with chronic imbalance and vestibular dysfunction

Shih Ching Yeh, Shuya Chen, Pa Chun Wang, Mu Chun Su, Chia Huang Chang, Po Yi Tsai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic imbalance is common in patients with vestibular dysfunction. Vestibular rehabilitation is effective in improving upright balance control. Vestibular rehabilitation exercises, such as Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, include simple repetitive movements and have limited feedback and adaptive training protocols. Interactive systems based on virtual reality (VR) technology may improve vestibular rehabilitation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an interactive 3-dimensional VR system for vestibular rehabilitation. METHODS: In 49 subjects with vestibular dysfunction, VR rehabilitation exercises were performed in 6 sessions. Before and after rehabilitation, subjects were evaluated for performance of the training exercises; the center of pressure was measured for 20 seconds and balance indices were determined. RESULTS: Five training scores (total 6) showed a significant improvement. For balance indices in condition of non-stimulation, all of them (total 5) showed a trend of improvement, in which there was a significant improvement in mean mediolateral. For balance indices in condition of post-stimulation, there was a significant improvement in statokinesigram and maximum mediolateral. CONCLUSIONS: The VR rehabilitation exercises were effective in improving upright balance control in patients with vestibular dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)915-921
Number of pages7
JournalTechnology and Health Care
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Balance
  • rehabilitation
  • vestibular
  • virtual reality

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