Identification of highly-cited papers using topic-model-based and bibliometric features: The consideration of keyword popularity

Ya Han Hu, Chun Tien Tai, Kang Ernest Liu, Cheng Fang Cai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The number of received citations have been used as an indicator of the impact of academic publications. Developing tools to find papers that have the potential to become highly-cited has recently attracted increasing scientific attention. Topics of concern by scholars may change over time in accordance with research trends, resulting in changes in received citations. Author-defined keywords, title and abstract provide valuable information about a research article. This study performs a latent Dirichlet allocation technique to extract topics and keywords from articles; five keyword popularity (KP) features are defined as indicators of emerging trends of articles. Binary classification models are utilized to predict papers that were highly-cited or less highly-cited by a number of supervised learning techniques. We empirically compare KP features of articles with other commonly used journal-related and author-related features proposed in previous studies. The results show that, with KP features, the prediction models are more effective than those with journal and/or author features, especially in the management information system discipline.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101004
JournalJournal of Informetrics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • binary classification
  • highly-cited papers
  • keyword popularity
  • supervised learning
  • topic model

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