Effects of strengthening intellectual property rights in newly industrialized economies: Evidence from Taiwan's 1994 patent reform

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Abstract

Does strengthening intellectual property rights (IPR) in terms of a longer patent life induce more patents? This article investigates the responses of high-technology firms to Taiwan's 1994 patent reform. Empirical analyses reveal that firms' patenting propensity rose gradually before patent reform and showed an increase after patent reform, tending to support the viewpoint that stronger IPR can induce more patents. However, this cannot lead to lasting effect. Furthermore, patenting capability can serve as the access ticket for potential entrants to a science park under the circumstance of stronger IPR protections. These new entrants are found to have a better post-entry performance in patenting relative to the incumbents in the short run. (JEL O14, O31)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-275
Number of pages17
JournalContemporary Economic Policy
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

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