Effects of Asian dust event particles on inflammation markers in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage in pulmonary hypertensive rats

Yu Chen Lei, Chang Chuan Chan, Peng Yau Wang, Chung Te Lee, Tsun Jen Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

107 Scopus citations

Abstract

The health impact of dust events from China has become a concern within China and in its neighboring countries. Previous epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between particulate matter exposure and cardiopulmonary mortality. Here, we use pulmonary hypertensive rat models to examine inflammation markers in the lung and in peripheral blood after exposure to Asian dust storm particles. Using a nose-only inhalation system, eight pulmonary hypertensive rats were exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from an actual Asian dust storm that took place between March 18 and 19, 2002; four control rats were also exposed to room air. Four rats exposed to CAPs of 315.6μg/m3 for 6h were classified as the low-exposure group, and another four rats exposed to CAPs of 684.5μg/m3 for 4.5h were classified as the high-exposure group. The animals were sacrificed 36h after exposure. Inflammation markers in the peripheral blood and in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were analyzed, and IL-6 in BAL was also determined using ELISA. White blood cell counts in peripheral blood increased with increased CAP exposure levels (P<0.001, test for trend). In BAL analysis, total cell numbers and the proportion of neutrophil also increased with increased CAP levels (P<0.001, test for trend for both markers). Positive dose-response relationships between CAP exposure and total protein (P<0.05) and between CAPs and LDH activity (P<0.05) were also observed. Moreover, IL-6 protein in BAL increasing with CAP levels (P<0.05, test for trend) was demonstrated. Our results revealed that exposure to particulate matters during an Asian dust storm could increase lung inflammation and injury in pulmonary hypertensive rats. Further studies are needed to determine the components of dust storm particles that may contribute to the particle toxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-76
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2004

Keywords

  • Ambient particles
  • Concentrator
  • Dust storm
  • Inflammation markers
  • Pulmonary hypertension

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of Asian dust event particles on inflammation markers in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage in pulmonary hypertensive rats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this