Characterization of the role of endogenous nitric oxide in myogenic vascular oscillations during cooling-evoked hemodynamic perturbations of rats

Yi Hsien Lin, Yia Ping Liu, Yu Chieh Lin, Po Lei Lee, Che Se Tung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rapid immersion of a rat’s limbs into 4 °C water, a model of cold stress, can elicit hemodynamic perturbations (CEHP). We previously reported that CEHP is highly relevant to sympathetic activation and nitric oxide production. This study identifies the role of nitric oxide in CEHP. Conscious rats were pretreated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (NG-nitro-Larginine methyl ester) alone or following the removal of sympathetic influences using hexamethonium or guanethidine. Rats were then subjected to a 10 min cold-stress trial. Hemodynamic indices were telemetrically monitored throughout the experiment. The analyses included measurements of systolic blood pressure; heart rate; dicrotic notch; short-term cardiovascular oscillations and coherence between blood pressure variability and heart rate variability in regions of very low frequency (0.02-0.2 Hz), low frequency (0.2-0.6 Hz), and high frequency (0.6-3.0 Hz). We observed different profiles of hemodynamic reaction between hexamethonium and guanethidine superimposed on L-NAME, suggesting an essential role for a functional adrenal medulla release of epinephrine under cold stress. These results indicate that endogenous nitric oxide plays an important role in the inhibition of sympathetic activation and cardiovascular oscillations in CEHP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)803-810
Number of pages8
JournalCanadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume95
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular oscillations
  • Cold stress
  • Hemodynamic perturbations
  • Nitric oxide
  • Sympathetic activation

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