Breaking failure and internal stability analysis of Geosynthetic Reinforced Earth walls

W. Y. Hung, H. T. Chen, C. J. Lee, Y. C. Wei

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

A number of methods have been proposed for the design of reinforced soil structures in recent years. However, different results were obtained from various design methods. The purpose of this study is to propose an assessment method for evaluating internal stability of the Geosynthetic Reinforced Earth (GRE) structures to close to the verge of failure. From observation of the modeling test results, it can be found that the failure plane with angle of θ = (β + φ)/2 encompasses the ruptures in the reinforcement and fit well to the failure wedge, where β is the wall inclination and φ the soil friction angle. On the other hand, the GRE structure was considered as a finite soil wall or slope with a homogeneous c-φ soil, and the proposed Reinforced Earth Structure Stability (RESS) assessment can estimate the critical wall height by the use of factor Am, which increases with increasing wall inclination and reinforcement layers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPhysical Modelling in Geotechnics - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics 2010, ICPMG 2010
PublisherCRC Press
Pages455-461
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9780415592895
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event7th International Conference on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics 2010, ICPMG 2010 - Zurich, Switzerland
Duration: 28 Jun 20101 Jul 2010

Publication series

NamePhysical Modelling in Geotechnics - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics 2010, ICPMG 2010
Volume1

Conference

Conference7th International Conference on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics 2010, ICPMG 2010
Country/TerritorySwitzerland
CityZurich
Period28/06/101/07/10

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