A study of learning time patterns in asynchronous learning environments

Wu Yuin Hwang, Chin Yu Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research makes use of learning time intensity, burst evaluating equations, and state denotation approaches to evaluate the learning time characteristics of students. Through comparing learning time intensity, six burst styles and three diligence styles are categorized. From the statistical results and interaction content analysis, some pedagogical phenomena were found. The first finding is that the more diligent learners were, the higher the quality and quantity of their interaction. The second is that learners whose learning time intensity was mainly located in the early period of the course and whose interaction content included many complaints were suspected to be possible dropouts. The third finding is that learners whose learning time intensity was mainly located in the later period had achievements that were significantly different from those of the regular periodical reading learners whose learning time intensity was distributed in all periods of the course. The above findings raise some issues and suggestions for those concerned with proposing asynchronous courses. As students can pace their own learning in an asynchronous learning environment, it is hard to avoid getting used to intermittent intensive reading. Instructors should consider seriously how to guide students to learn in a proper sequence through a well-scheduled instructional programme. It is necessary to encourage students to exercise self-discipline in regular on-line reading for better learning outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-304
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Learning
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004

Keywords

  • Interaction
  • Learning activity
  • Learning time distribution
  • Learning time intensity
  • Learning time pattern

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