A Small Peak in the Swarm-LP Plasma Density Data at the Dayside Dip Equator

Hosub Song, Jaeheung Park, Stephan Buchert, Yaqi Jin, Chi Kuang Chao, Jaejin Lee, Yu Yi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we statistically investigate an artifact in Langmuir Probe (LP) observations of Swarm satellites. A small peak of electron density (Ne) is frequently found in the Swarm data around the dayside dip equator. On the contrary, they appear in neither the Total Electron Content data of the Swarm/Global Positioning System Receivers nor COSMIC-2 in-situ measurements at similar altitudes but with low orbit inclination. Arguably, this peak does not represent natural ionospheric irregularities but is likely to result from artifacts. The phenomena are found regardless of the season, solar activity, and the velocity direction of the satellite (ascending and descending). They predominantly occur when the magnetic declination is close to zero, that is, when the Swarm ram direction and the Earth's magnetic field are aligned under sunlight. Hence, we attribute the phenomenon to intensified secondary electrons escape when the geomagnetic field lines are normal to conducting surfaces that emit secondary electrons. Since the magnitude of the artifact is only a few percent of the large-scale background, it does not have a serious impact on the value of the Swarm/LP data in scientific research. Nevertheless, future efforts to determine the exact cause of the artifacts will contribute to improving the reliability and quality of plasma density and temperature measured by Swarm/LP.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2022JA030319
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
Volume127
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • COSMIC2
  • Langmuir Probe
  • electron temperature
  • plasma density
  • swarm
  • total electron content

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