A practical reliability-based method for assessing soil liquefaction potential

J. H. Hwang, C. W. Yang, D. S. Juang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current simplified methods for assessing soil liquefaction potential use a deterministic safety factor in order to judge whether liquefaction will occur or not. However, these methods are unable to determine the liquefaction probability related to a safety factor. An answer to this problem can be found by reliability analysis. This paper presents a reliability analysis method based on the popular Seed'85 liquefaction analysis method. This reliability method uses the empirical acceleration attenuation law in the Taiwan area to derive the probability density distribution function (PDF) and the statistics for the earthquake-induced cyclic shear stress ratio (CSR). The PDF and the statistics for the cyclic resistance ratio (CRR) can be deduced from some probabilistic cyclic resistance curves. These curves are produced by the regression of the liquefaction and non-liquefaction data from the Chi-Chi earthquake and others around the world, using, with minor modifications, the logistic model proposed by Liao [J. Geotech. Eng. 114 (1988) 389]. The CSR and CRR statistics are used in conjunction with the first order and second moment method, to calculate the relation between the liquefaction probability, the safety factor and the reliability index. Based on the proposed method, the liquefaction probability related to a safety factor can be easily calculated. The influence of some of the soil parameters on the liquefaction probability can be quantitatively evaluated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)761-770
Number of pages10
JournalSoil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering
Volume24
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Keywords

  • Probability density function
  • Reliability analysis
  • Soil liqu0efaction

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